Retrieve Answers List

You can use this API request to retrieve a paged list of the answers posted to your AnswerHub site.

/services/v2/answer.json

You can use the following parameters in your retrieve answers list request:

Specific: topics, unanswered
Paging and Sorting: page, pageSize, sort
Search: q, type, lang
Projection: include, exclude, includeOnly
Other options: wrap, v1

🚧

Permissions & Notes:

  • You must have the View answers in the question page and View the questions list permissions under Anonymous Roles under the Advanced Editor.

  • With the includeOnly parameter set to id and name (/services/v2/answer.json?includeOnly=id,name) to the AnswerHub REST API.

  • We added this request in version 1.6.3.

Sample Request

A GET retrieve answers list request sent to https://apidocs.cloud.answerhub.com using a human-readable Username/Password (answerhub/test123) would look like this:

curl 
-u answerhub:test123 
-H "Accept: application/json" 
-H "Content-type: application/json" 
-X GET "https://apidocs.cloud.answerhub.com/services/v2/answer.json"

Sample Responses

Example Response If You Don't Have Permission
Error Response:

  • HTTP Status 401 Unauthorized
{
    "errors": {
        "message": "You don't have permission to do this action.<br>Please login as another user"
    }
}

Successful Example Response If You Have Permission
Succesful Response:
HTTP Status 200 - OK

{
    "name": "",
    "sort": "votes",
    "page": 1,
    "pageSize": 10,
    "pageCount": 24,
    "listCount": 10,
    "totalCount": 237,
    "sorts": [
        "active",
        "newest",
        "hottest",
        "votes",
        "viewCount",
        "usedCount",
        "answerCount",
        "answerCountAsc",
        "commentCount",
        "favoriteCount",
        "followers",
        "reportCount"
    ],
    "list": [
        {
            "id": 474,
            "type": "answer",
            "creationDate": 1545231773000,
            "creationDateFormatted": "12/19/2018 03:02 PM",
            "title": "Yes, and it’s because heat in electr ...",
            "body": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\">Yes, and it’s because heat in electrical components causes electrons inside to move around unpredictably. This behaviour can be captured electronically and digitised as a sequence of truly random numbers.</div>",
            "bodyAsHTML": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\">\n Yes, and it’s because heat in electrical components causes electrons inside to move around unpredictably. This behaviour can be captured electronically and digitised as a sequence of truly random numbers.\n</div>",
            "author": {
                "id": 21,
                "username": "einstein",
                "realname": "Albert Einstein",
                "reputation": 47
            },
            "lastEditedAction": 495,
            "activeRevisionId": 474,
            "revisionIds": [
                474
            ],
            "lastActiveUserId": 21,
            "lastActiveDate": 1545231773000,
            "originalParentId": 473,
            "attachments": [],
            "childrenIds": [],
            "commentIds": [],
            "marked": false,
            "topics": [],
            "containerIds": [],
            "wiki": false,
            "score": 1,
            "depth": 0,
            "viewCount": 0,
            "upVoteCount": 1,
            "downVoteCount": 0,
            "nodeStates": []
        },
        {
            "id": 800,
            "type": "answer",
            "creationDate": 1547663719000,
            "creationDateFormatted": "01/16/2019 06:35 PM",
            "title": "You can go to the following link: ht ...",
            "body": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\"><p>You can go to the following link: <a rel=\"noopener noreferrer noopener noreferrer\" href=\"https://api.dzonesoftware.com/\" target=\"_blank\">https://api.dzonesoftware.com/</a></p></div>",
            "bodyAsHTML": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\"><p>You can go to the following link: <a rel=\"noopener noreferrer noopener noreferrer noopener noreferrer\" href=\"https://api.dzonesoftware.com/\" target=\"_blank\">https://api.dzonesoftware.com/</a></p></div>",
            "author": {
                "id": 7,
                "username": "dzone",
                "reputation": 54
            },
            "lastEditedAction": 917,
            "activeRevisionId": 800,
            "revisionIds": [
                800
            ],
            "lastActiveUserId": 7,
            "lastActiveDate": 1547663719000,
            "originalParentId": 806,
            "attachments": [],
            "childrenIds": [],
            "commentIds": [],
            "marked": true,
            "topics": [],
            "containerIds": [],
            "wiki": false,
            "score": 1,
            "depth": 0,
            "viewCount": 0,
            "upVoteCount": 1,
            "downVoteCount": 0,
            "nodeStates": [
                "accepted"
            ]
        },
        {
            "id": 31,
            "type": "answer",
            "creationDate": 1545231737000,
            "creationDateFormatted": "12/19/2018 03:02 PM",
            "title": "Yes. Several species of fish can bre ...",
            "body": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\">Yes. Several species of fish can breathe air and crawl on land. There are about 50 species of flying fish, too.</div>",
            "bodyAsHTML": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\">\n Yes. Several species of fish can breathe air and crawl on land. There are about 50 species of flying fish, too.\n</div>",
            "author": {
                "id": 21,
                "username": "einstein",
                "realname": "Albert Einstein",
                "reputation": 47
            },
            "lastEditedAction": 56,
            "activeRevisionId": 31,
            "revisionIds": [
                31
            ],
            "lastActiveUserId": 21,
            "lastActiveDate": 1545231737000,
            "originalParentId": 30,
            "attachments": [],
            "childrenIds": [],
            "commentIds": [],
            "marked": false,
            "topics": [],
            "containerIds": [],
            "wiki": false,
            "score": 1,
            "depth": 0,
            "viewCount": 0,
            "upVoteCount": 1,
            "downVoteCount": 0,
            "nodeStates": []
        },
        {
            "id": 161,
            "type": "answer",
            "creationDate": 1545231748000,
            "creationDateFormatted": "12/19/2018 03:02 PM",
            "body": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\">If you have ‘perfect’ visual acuity, you have 20/20 vision, as measured by the standard eye chart devised by a Dutch ophthalmologist called Dr Hermann Snellen in 1862. The charts, which are still in use, have a single large letter at the top and lines of progressively smaller letters below. The first figure refers to how far away (in feet) the person whose vision is being measured is sitting or standing from the chart. The second figure refers to how far away a person with good vision would have to be and still be able to read the same line of letters as the person being tested. If you had 20/30 vision, a person with perfect vision could read at 30 feet the same letters that you can just make out at 20 feet. These distances are now generally expressed in metres, so that ‘perfect’ 20:20 sight would now be written as 6:6.</div>",
            "bodyAsHTML": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\">\n If you have ‘perfect’ visual acuity, you have 20/20 vision, as measured by the standard eye chart devised by a Dutch ophthalmologist called Dr Hermann Snellen in 1862. The charts, which are still in use, have a single large letter at the top and lines of progressively smaller letters below. The first figure refers to how far away (in feet) the person whose vision is being measured is sitting or standing from the chart. The second figure refers to how far away a person with good vision would have to be and still be able to read the same line of letters as the person being tested. If you had 20/30 vision, a person with perfect vision could read at 30 feet the same letters that you can just make out at 20 feet. These distances are now generally expressed in metres, so that ‘perfect’ 20:20 sight would now be written as 6:6.\n</div>",
            "author": {
                "id": 21,
                "username": "einstein",
                "realname": "Albert Einstein",
                "reputation": 47
            },
            "lastEditedAction": 186,
            "activeRevisionId": 161,
            "revisionIds": [
                161
            ],
            "lastActiveUserId": 7,
            "lastActiveDate": 1548254410000,
            "originalParentId": 160,
            "attachments": [],
            "childrenIds": [
                813
            ],
            "commentIds": [
                813
            ],
            "marked": false,
            "topics": [],
            "containerIds": [],
            "wiki": false,
            "score": 1,
            "depth": 0,
            "viewCount": 0,
            "upVoteCount": 1,
            "downVoteCount": 0,
            "nodeStates": []
        },
        {
            "id": 442,
            "type": "answer",
            "creationDate": 1545231770000,
            "creationDateFormatted": "12/19/2018 03:02 PM",
            "body": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\">A runny nose is normally caused by streaming eyes draining through the tear ducts into the nose. The watering eye’s response is mediated by the trigeminal nerve, which is the main facial nerve and has branches in the mouth, nose and eyes. The response probably evolved as a way of flushing the eyes and nose of irritants. With hot food, that irritant is the capsaicin oil; in cold weather, the drying effect of the wind is to blame.</div>",
            "bodyAsHTML": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\">\n A runny nose is normally caused by streaming eyes draining through the tear ducts into the nose. The watering eye’s response is mediated by the trigeminal nerve, which is the main facial nerve and has branches in the mouth, nose and eyes. The response probably evolved as a way of flushing the eyes and nose of irritants. With hot food, that irritant is the capsaicin oil; in cold weather, the drying effect of the wind is to blame.\n</div>",
            "author": {
                "id": 21,
                "username": "einstein",
                "realname": "Albert Einstein",
                "reputation": 47
            },
            "lastEditedAction": 463,
            "activeRevisionId": 442,
            "revisionIds": [
                442
            ],
            "lastActiveUserId": 21,
            "lastActiveDate": 1545231770000,
            "originalParentId": 441,
            "attachments": [],
            "childrenIds": [],
            "commentIds": [],
            "marked": false,
            "topics": [],
            "containerIds": [],
            "wiki": false,
            "score": 0,
            "depth": 0,
            "viewCount": 0,
            "upVoteCount": 0,
            "downVoteCount": 0,
            "nodeStates": []
        },
        {
            "id": 811,
            "type": "answer",
            "creationDate": 1547743939000,
            "creationDateFormatted": "01/17/2019 04:52 PM",
            "body": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\"><p>Go to this page and navigate down to the GDPR category for those specific endpoints: <a rel=\"noopener noreferrer noopener noreferrer\" href=\"https://api.dzonesoftware.com/v1.8/reference\" target=\"_blank\">https://api.dzonesoftware.com/v1.8/reference</a></p></div>",
            "bodyAsHTML": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\"><p>Go to this page and navigate down to the GDPR category for those specific endpoints: <a rel=\"noopener noreferrer noopener noreferrer noopener noreferrer\" href=\"https://api.dzonesoftware.com/v1.8/reference\" target=\"_blank\">https://api.dzonesoftware.com/v1.8/reference</a></p></div>",
            "author": {
                "id": 7,
                "username": "dzone",
                "reputation": 54
            },
            "lastEditedAction": 933,
            "activeRevisionId": 811,
            "revisionIds": [
                811
            ],
            "lastActiveUserId": 7,
            "lastActiveDate": 1547743939000,
            "originalParentId": 535,
            "attachments": [],
            "childrenIds": [],
            "commentIds": [],
            "marked": false,
            "topics": [],
            "containerIds": [],
            "wiki": false,
            "score": 0,
            "depth": 0,
            "viewCount": 0,
            "upVoteCount": 0,
            "downVoteCount": 0,
            "nodeStates": []
        },
        {
            "id": 478,
            "type": "answer",
            "creationDate": 1545231773000,
            "creationDateFormatted": "12/19/2018 03:02 PM",
            "body": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\">The most likely theory is for the same reason that we move our eyes around – to stabilize the image of their surroundings while in motion. When a pigeon is walking on a treadmill, so that its environment remains relatively the same, its head does not bob. Not all birds bob their heads, though, so the issue is not yet fully resolved.</div>",
            "bodyAsHTML": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\">\n The most likely theory is for the same reason that we move our eyes around – to stabilize the image of their surroundings while in motion. When a pigeon is walking on a treadmill, so that its environment remains relatively the same, its head does not bob. Not all birds bob their heads, though, so the issue is not yet fully resolved.\n</div>",
            "author": {
                "id": 21,
                "username": "einstein",
                "realname": "Albert Einstein",
                "reputation": 47
            },
            "lastEditedAction": 499,
            "activeRevisionId": 478,
            "revisionIds": [
                478
            ],
            "lastActiveUserId": 21,
            "lastActiveDate": 1545231773000,
            "originalParentId": 477,
            "attachments": [],
            "childrenIds": [],
            "commentIds": [],
            "marked": false,
            "topics": [],
            "containerIds": [],
            "wiki": false,
            "score": 0,
            "depth": 0,
            "viewCount": 0,
            "upVoteCount": 0,
            "downVoteCount": 0,
            "nodeStates": []
        },
        {
            "id": 446,
            "type": "answer",
            "creationDate": 1545231770000,
            "creationDateFormatted": "12/19/2018 03:02 PM",
            "body": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\">Most species respond to tickling or other light touches by withdrawing to avoid the attack on the vulnerable area. It appears that we learn to laugh at tickling as children only when we perceive the tickling as a mock attack that is actually an act of personal closeness. Interestingly, recent research by the cognitive neuroscientist Sarah-Jayne Blakemore has shown that we can’t tickle ourselves, no matter how hard we try.</div>",
            "bodyAsHTML": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\">\n Most species respond to tickling or other light touches by withdrawing to avoid the attack on the vulnerable area. It appears that we learn to laugh at tickling as children only when we perceive the tickling as a mock attack that is actually an act of personal closeness. Interestingly, recent research by the cognitive neuroscientist Sarah-Jayne Blakemore has shown that we can’t tickle ourselves, no matter how hard we try.\n</div>",
            "author": {
                "id": 21,
                "username": "einstein",
                "realname": "Albert Einstein",
                "reputation": 47
            },
            "lastEditedAction": 467,
            "activeRevisionId": 446,
            "revisionIds": [
                446
            ],
            "lastActiveUserId": 21,
            "lastActiveDate": 1545231770000,
            "originalParentId": 445,
            "attachments": [],
            "childrenIds": [],
            "commentIds": [],
            "marked": false,
            "topics": [],
            "containerIds": [],
            "wiki": false,
            "score": 0,
            "depth": 0,
            "viewCount": 0,
            "upVoteCount": 0,
            "downVoteCount": 0,
            "nodeStates": []
        },
        {
            "id": 824,
            "type": "answer",
            "creationDate": 1549288862000,
            "creationDateFormatted": "02/04/2019 02:01 PM",
            "body": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\"><p>I don&#39;t know either.</p></div>",
            "bodyAsHTML": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\">\n <p>I don't know either.</p>\n</div>",
            "author": {
                "id": 111,
                "username": "suspendabletestuser",
                "reputation": 1
            },
            "lastEditedAction": 1024,
            "activeRevisionId": 835,
            "revisionIds": [
                835
            ],
            "lastActiveUserId": 111,
            "lastActiveDate": 1549288862000,
            "originalParentId": 551,
            "attachments": [],
            "childrenIds": [],
            "commentIds": [],
            "marked": false,
            "topics": [],
            "containerIds": [],
            "wiki": false,
            "score": 0,
            "depth": 0,
            "viewCount": 0,
            "upVoteCount": 0,
            "downVoteCount": 0,
            "nodeStates": []
        },
        {
            "id": 482,
            "type": "answer",
            "creationDate": 1545231774000,
            "creationDateFormatted": "12/19/2018 03:02 PM",
            "body": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\">Haven’t we answered this question before? German workers in the 19th century suggested that déjà vu is a sort of cognitive burp. This occurs when the processes of sensation and perception, that normally occur simultaneously, somehow get out of sync. The modern take on this is that the ‘retrieval’ and ‘familiarity’ processes in the brain are not synchronized. But there are many other theories, and no-one really knows, so at the moment the answer is no, it cannot.</div>",
            "bodyAsHTML": "<div class=\"fr-view clearfix\">\n Haven’t we answered this question before? German workers in the 19th century suggested that d&eacute;j&agrave; vu is a sort of cognitive burp. This occurs when the processes of sensation and perception, that normally occur simultaneously, somehow get out of sync. The modern take on this is that the ‘retrieval’ and ‘familiarity’ processes in the brain are not synchronized. But there are many other theories, and no-one really knows, so at the moment the answer is no, it cannot.\n</div>",
            "author": {
                "id": 21,
                "username": "einstein",
                "realname": "Albert Einstein",
                "reputation": 47
            },
            "lastEditedAction": 503,
            "activeRevisionId": 482,
            "revisionIds": [
                482
            ],
            "lastActiveUserId": 21,
            "lastActiveDate": 1545231774000,
            "originalParentId": 481,
            "attachments": [],
            "childrenIds": [],
            "commentIds": [],
            "marked": false,
            "topics": [],
            "containerIds": [],
            "wiki": false,
            "score": 0,
            "depth": 0,
            "viewCount": 0,
            "upVoteCount": 0,
            "downVoteCount": 0,
            "nodeStates": []
        }
    ]
}
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